All new 2022 Kawasaki Z650 RS vs 2022 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone vs 2022 Yamaha XSR700 Full details analysis.

All new 2022 Kawasaki Z650 RS vs 2022 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone vs 2022 Yamaha XSR700 Full details analysis. 

Imptags : Kawasaki Z650 RS vs 2022 Moto Guzzi V7 stone, 2022 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone vs 2022 Yamaha XSR700, 2022 Kawasaki Z650 RS VS 2022 Yamaha XSR700,

Modern motorcycle design is not the latest craze for everyone, some are more into the shapes and designs of the good old 1960s and 70s - when round headlights and no fairings were still common. Fortunately, the Kawasaki Z650 RS, Moto Guzzi V7 Stone and Yamaha XSR700 are new machines that look like they were from back then, but boast the latest technology!

The retro trend isn't abating - but why should it? In most cases, these things look really good and just work like modern bikes! In addition, it is now finally clear that not only those who grew up in the 1960s and 70s were influenced by the design of the motorcycles of that time. Even young people, maybe even beginners, like the retro look - probably because they don't like the many corners, edges and overlapping lines of modern machines.

The Moto Guzzi V7 Stone is a contemporary bike disguised as a classic machine

It's much nicer when an uncovered engine still plays the main role in a motorcycle - and that's where the Moto Guzzi V7 Stone comes into play. Apart from the fact that it has the largest two-cylinder in the field with its 853 cc, it is also implanted in the V7 Stone in the most unusual form of the trio. A longitudinally installed V2 with cylinders protruding diagonally upwards can now only be found at Guzzi and this style element is sufficiently celebrated by the Italians. The whole machine is clearly recognizable as a classic V7, but with the LED round headlights and successful daytime running lights in the shape of the typical Guzzi eagle wings, it skilfully looks into the modern age and drives like a thoroughly competitive, up-to-date bike. Of course, the machine also benefits from the increase in displacement and the associated increase in performance compared to its predecessor. With 65 hp, it not only just brings up the rear in our comparison (Kawasaki Z650 RS 68.2 hp, Yamaha XSR700 73.4 hp), it is also by far the heaviest at 222.5 kg (Kawasaki 187.5 kg, Yamaha 190.5 kilos) and therefore not only the most unsportsmanlike on paper. It shouldn't be forgotten that the other two are just sporty naked bikes that have been remodeled in terms of appearance, while the Guzzi has been further developed and modernized for decades - deep down it embodies the old values. at 222.5 kilos, it is also by far the heaviest (Kawasaki 187.5 kilos, Yamaha 190.5 kilos) and thus not only the least sporty on paper. It shouldn't be forgotten that the other two are just sporty naked bikes that have been remodeled in terms of appearance, while the Guzzi has been further developed and modernized for decades - deep down it embodies the old values. at 222.5 kilos, it is also by far the heaviest (Kawasaki 187.5 kilos, Yamaha 190.5 kilos) and thus not only the least sporty on paper. It shouldn't be forgotten that the other two are just sporty naked bikes that have been remodeled in terms of appearance, while the Guzzi has been further developed and modernized for decades - deep down it embodies the old values.


The Kawasaki Z650 RS that doesn't look really retro

Despite all modernity, this year's newcomer in the class of entry-level retro bikes creates a really good classic look - the Kawasaki Z650 RS is only slightly inferior to its highly successful sister Z900 RS. There is hardly a detail on the small RS that doesn't look really retro, even the fittings with two analogue round instruments and the small LCD in between appear more than harmonious and show the attention to detail. The Yamaha's round, but still rather difficult to read LCD cockpit can't keep up and the larger, but also not optimally readable LCD display of the Moto Guzzi even seems a bit out of place on the otherwise successful Guzzi.


The saddle of the Kawasaki Z650 RS not only looks well padded, it is!

So let's stay with the Kawa, which comes very close to the Moto Guzzi in terms of visual credibility. It almost looks as if the engineers actually made sure that an RS version should also be built when they designed the normal Z650. Almost everything fits in terms of proportions and the striking green with golden rims gives the rest of the successful appearance. The best thing about it is that the saddle is not only visually reminiscent of the times when saddles were still well padded, it is it is! And so the overall ergonomics mean that you can also cycle further stages on the Kawa.


The Kawasaki Z650 RS is recommended for novice drivers, but also for ambitious drivers

Because the chassis is also really well tuned, when you sit down you still think that it is pretty soft and expects a rather spongy handling in curves, which then turns out to be surprisingly stable. The double disc brakes are also the best in our trio and the in-line two-cylinder engine with 649 cc, apart from its somewhat tinny sound when stationary, is also a sporty companion, which pushes well from below and becomes more and more powerful over the course of the speed range, even without the inexperienced or to overwhelm novice drivers. But if you are ambitious, you won't be disappointed either - I would say honest 68 hp.

The Yamaha XSR700 CP2 engine is unrivaled in this class

Nevertheless, there is still the third in our comparison that narrowly but still wins the engine chapter - the Yamaha XSR700. Not only is it the strongest, it also has the corniest middle of all three and is therefore the most fun to drive for me personally. At least when it comes to the engine and its elasticity, the incredibly successful CP2 engine with 689 cc is unrivaled in this class. While the Yamaha's chassis is a good compromise between sport and comfort on its own, the Kawa still does it better. And when it came to the brakes, the Yamaha technicians didn't dare the least, the Kawa's system clearly grips better and even the heavier Moto Guzzi, which has to make do with a disc at the front, is on par with the Yamaha. But I don't want to be unfair, after all it's also about beginners, because the manufacturers usually don't want to install brakes that are too snappy. And safe deceleration works flawlessly on all three. In addition, the Yamaha also has a similarly comfortable ergonomics as the Kawasaki and can therefore be used on longer distances without any problems.

The Yamaha XSR700 delights in the stocky proportions

I also rate the look of the Yamaha as successful, it's not the fault of the Yamaha XSR700 that the Z650 RS and the Moto Guzzi V7 Stone are so smart! So I enjoy the Yamse's really cool, attached rear light, the round LED headlight and the stocky proportions. The fact that it interprets the retro theme in the least credible way and that the LCD cockpit looks a little cheaper is only noticeable in a direct comparison.

The other two don't come close to the image of a real Guzzi

If I had to choose just one in this trio, it would certainly be the Kawasaki Z650 RS. The look appeals to me enormously because of the really successful proportions and the driving performance is at a level that makes it one of the most universal, but at the same time also sportiest in this class. But after that I would already go for the Yamaha, because I enjoy the engine so much that I could suppress the small inconsistencies (which maybe only I notice anyway). The fact that I put the most genuine retro iron in this comparison, the Moto Guzzi V7 Stone, in last place is actually only because the other two woke up more sportsmanship in me in a direct comparison.


Because if it had been an individual test of the Moto Guzzi V7 Stone, I would have rated it as a well-balanced machine with a comfortable seating position, a comfortable chassis and an amazingly good single disc brake at the front, which scores above all with its characterful V2 engine. The V7 Stone should not only appeal to true Guzzi fans, but also to all those who are looking for an uncomplicated motorcycle with the highest degree of independence and credibility. And the other two just don't come close to this image of a real Guzzi. And so it should be okay for many that the Moto Guzzi is by far the most expensive in German-speaking countries. but also all those who are looking for an uncomplicated motorcycle with the highest level of independence and credibility. And the other two just don't come close to this image of a real Guzzi. And so it should be okay for many that the Moto Guzzi is by far the most expensive in German-speaking countries. but also all those who are looking for an uncomplicated motorcycle with the highest level of independence and credibility. And the other two just don't come close to this image of a real Guzzi. And so it should be okay for many that the Moto Guzzi is by far the most expensive in German-speaking countries.

All new 2022 Kawasaki Z650 RS vs 2022 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone vs 2022 Yamaha XSR700 Full details analysis. 


Imptags : Kawasaki Z650 RS vs 2022 Moto Guzzi V7 stone, 2022 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone vs 2022 Yamaha XSR700, 2022 Kawasaki Z650 RS VS 2022 Yamaha XSR700,

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