CR700W Track Weapon UnveilingThe $116,000 21st century evolution of Norton's rotary engine.

CR700W Track Weapon UnveilingThe $116,000 21st century evolution of Norton's rotary engine.

Imptags : CR700W weapon unveiling, CR700W Track Weapon UnveilingThe $116,000 21st century evolution of Norton's rotary engine. CR700W weapon unveiling, 

CR700W Track Weapon UnveilingThe $116,000 21st century evolution of Norton's rotary engine.

The ability to walk into a dealership and ride out on a 200-hp-plus superbike is no longer a pipe dream. Even so, the concept of a 690cc engine producing 220 horsepower and weighing just 277 pounds sounds a little outlandish.


The Crighton CR700W is precisely that, thanks to its unique rotary engine. It is the ultimate evolution of the Norton 588 racebikes that took Steve Hislop to victory in the Senior TT at the Isle of Man in 1992, and carried Steve Spray, Trevor Nation, and Ian Simpson to British championships from 1989 to 1994. The brains behind those Norton racers, which took advantage of rotary engines' ability to make vast power from small cubic capacity, Brian Crighton, remains a vocal advocate for the concept at the age of 73, and is also the man behind the CR700W.

The engine is the result of a 12-year collaboration between designer Crighton and manufacturer Rotron Power, which makes rotaries for use in everything from drones to watercraft, and even range extenders for cars. As opposed to the old Norton's 588cc capacity, the new engine has a 690cc capacity, and there are only three moving parts, weighs 53 pounds, measures little more than 13 inches across, and has a 9-inch diameter. The package weighs just 95 pounds even with the Nova Transmissions six-speed gearbox attached.


A 220 horsepower peak is delivered at 10,500 rpm, accompanied by 105 pound-feet of torque at 9,500 rpm, giving the engine a power-to-weight ratio equal to that of a MotoGP machine.

CR700W's price continues to impress. These bikes are track-only machines that cannot be used on the road and start at 85,000 pounds in the UK. At today's rates, that's a little over $116,000! Just 25 will be assembled by Crighton himself at Rotron's base.


Those familiar with Norton's rotary racers from the 1990s will recognize the chassis, which shares the same extruded beam frame and swingarm as the originals made by Spondon. Its bodywork, meanwhile, is reminiscent of the Norton NRV588—a brief revival of the rotary idea that appeared in 2009 and was originally intended to race at the TT once again after Stuart Garner revived the Norton brand. Other components include Dymag carbon fiber wheels, your choice of Öhlins or Bitubo suspension, and MotoGP-spec Brembo brakes.


Brian Crighton said: "In many ways, the CR700W is the culmination of my career. With my excellent lead engineer, Shamoon Quarashi, it encapsulates all of my engineering wisdom. The result is the ultimate track and racing motorcycle.”

CEO Alex Head of Rotron Power says the CR700W is a unique motorcycling masterpiece and a true work of art, a result of Brian's passion and genius for creating exceptional engines and race bikes. It is more powerful per cc than any other normally aspirated engine in the world, with a greater power-to-weight ratio than the Aprilia RSV4, or even the supercharged Kawasaki H2R. The performance speaks for itself, yet despite the numbers it is far from a highly stressed racing engine that needs rebuilding after every race weekend, and instead, thanks to its low-revving design, ultralow friction materials, and unique internal geometry, it is resoundingly robust and reliable, and will run a full season before requiring internal inspection. Few machines are as exclusive, with performance and uniqueness to match."

CR700W Track Weapon UnveilingThe $116,000 21st century evolution of Norton's rotary engine.

Imptags : CR700W weapon unveiling, CR700W Track Weapon UnveilingThe $116,000 21st century evolution of Norton's rotary engine. CR700W weapon unveiling, 


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